Sunday, March 3, 2013

Bolt Action - Sikh (British) Army

     I am following my Flames of War decision of playing Indian Sikhs in Warlord's Bolt Action, a 28mm WW2 system. I find the Sikhs' look unique on the tabletop, and I admire their religion's goal of fighting oppression and injustice. Their mission explains their willingness to volunteer for military service in WW2 even though The Sikhs couldn't stand by and let innocents be killed. Amazing in my eyes.


     Sikhs can be found in almost every battlefield of WW2. A Sikh RAF pilot even took part in the Battle of Britain. This rich history will make it possible for me to field my army in Africa, Italy, or Asia.

     The picture above shows some Sikh in Monte Cassino at the Gustav Line, which they played a role in. My game group and I are forming our forces around this encounter. Thus, I will be running Sikh foot soldiers backed up by Canadian Army (Sherman tank).

     Warlord makes a batch of Sikh heads, which I am placing on my British infantrymen. Here is my first assembled figure that I will experiment with for a paint scheme.

     The Sikhs were famous for the courage on the battlefield.


     I am intrigued how this soldier has camo-netting over his dastar (turban).






















3 comments:

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  2. Found your site while researching my own Sikh force for Bolt Action. The Bolt Action turbans look great, but I am not really a fan of the camo-netting turbans. Rather than looking like turbans, they just look like an odd mess of hair. Perhaps, once painted up, they will be okay.

    I am also thinking that I might just put in some soldiers without turbans and use the regular helmets to reflect a few Hindu soldiers in the squads.

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  3. Sadly, as far as I can research, the different ethnic groups did not integrate due to dietary and religious restrictions. It would look good on the tabletop for variety though. Some of my pictures above do show helmets and turbans mixing though, so I guess they did mix.

    It is very hard to find any information on non-White Commonwealth soldiers.

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